Open House

First Open House attracted many visitors / Success story will be continued

On April 14, 2016, Fraunhofer ICT-IMM hosted its first Flow Chemistry Demonstration Workshop at the institute in Mainz to a group of more than 50 invited industrial attendees.

After a warm welcome and opening remarks by institute director Prof. Dr. Michael Maskos, the morning was occupied with talks. One of these was given by the key note lecturer Prof. Dr. Jaap Schouten from the Technical University Eindhoven. This was followed by a tandem lecture by Dr. Thomas Rehm from Fraunhofer ICT-IMM and Dr. Susanne Riegel from Nanalysis Corp. showcasing an example of a very successful industrial cooperation. The session was concluded by the Deputy Head of the Energy and Chemical technology Department Dr. Patrick Löb highlighting the history of flow chemistry at Fraunhofer ICT-IMM.

The second half of the day was full of action: eight different set-ups were in operation performing actual chemical processes live. Showcased were reactive intermediate synthesis exemplified through a Grignard reagent, nanoencapsulation, photochemistry and inline NMR, hydrogenation, nanoparticle synthesis exemplified through quantum dots, and a set-up representing the higher throughput reactors developed recently at Fraunhofer ICT-IMM to allow a true continuous development chain from the laboratory into production.

The positive feedback from the event will be used and channeled into the preparations for a successful new edition of the event in the near future. “We definitely will transfer the successful concept of this day to the other branches of the institute”, Prof. Maskos points out. 

Lab Stations - Find your expert, discuss your needs

Efficient and Effective Access to Reactive Intermediates

Reactor for Grignard reagent formation
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM
Magnesium turnings
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

You can expect to learn how Gringnard reagents can be formed continuously including process control and analytics. Starting with a large excess of magnesium, being in situ activated, our setup will guarantee a continuous feed of liquid and solid components. This results in an on-demand production of the Grignard reagent being already optimized in terms of time and quantity. Quality improvement goes hand in hand with cost savings.

Thinking ahead:

  • Potential use in other solid consuming reactions, such as Friedel-Crafts-Acylation
  • In situ generation of Grignard reagent including inline quality control followed by immediate consumption via Grignard reaction

Your expert:

Dr. Gabriele Menges-Flanagan
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Dr. Gabriele Menges-Flanagan (*1972), graduate chemist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 2005. Her research focuses on reactive intermediates, solid processing in flow, C-C bond formation, and inline analytics. 

Online-NMR analysis for lab plants

ContiNMR
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM
ContiNMR testrig
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

You can expect to learn how the analysis of fluorine fine chemicals can be advanced by integrating benchtop NMR in your process. This approach has been realized by combining a versatile continuous flow reaction setup with a compact benchtop NMR system and an electronically regulated liquid control system. The mobile setup is especially dedicated for 19F-NMR spectroscopy coming with a LabView-based Software control. A cost-intensive high-field NMR spectrometer equipment is no longer required. A custom-specific adaptation of the flow cells, liquid control system and software interface is easily possible.

Thinking ahead:

  • Continuous-flow measurements for quality control
  • Stopped-flow measurements for process development
  • Straight forward coupling to lab synthesis plant

Your expert:

Dr. Thomas Rehm
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Dr. Thomas H. Rehm (*1978), graduate chemist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 2011. His research focuses on online-NMR analytics, photochemistry in microstructured environment, fine chemical synthesis with carbon-based catalyst materials and fluorine chemistry for pharmaceuticals. 

Continuous-Flow Photochemical Catalysis

Falling film micro reactor for photo chemistry
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM
Reactor for photo chemistry
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

You can expect to learn how applying microstructured reactor equipment for continuous flow synthesis

in conjunction with LED technology as an energy efficient light source can solve the technological challenges going along with photochemically catalyzed reactions. We provide solutions for homogeneous and heterogeneous photocatalysis offering wavelength-specific irradiation and efficient temperature management. You gain improved process control due to advanced wavelength-specific irradiation, reduced hot-spot formation and a defined time frame for irradiation. The use of LED technology lowers energy consumption and avoids the need for expensive filter equipment.

Thinking ahead:

  • in-situ singlet oxygen formation
  • Fluorination reactions
  • Isomerization of stilbene derivatives
  • Photoredox catalyzed reactions in general

Your expert:

Dr. Thomas Rehm
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Dr. Thomas H. Rehm (*1978), graduate chemist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 2011. His research focuses on online-NMR analytics, photochemistry in microstructured environment, fine chemical synthesis with carbon-based catalyst materials and fluorine chemistry for pharmaceuticals. 

Modular Multi-Purpose Setup for the Continuous Production of High Quality Nano Materials

Reactor for nanoparticle synthesis
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM
Quantum dots
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

You can expect to learn how high quality nano materials can be easily synthesized via a continuous process giving access to high temperatures – if required. The setup allows an easy and fast parameter optimization and includes all necessary inline analytics. Modularity and easy parameter change make the whole setup multi-purpose. A tight process control guarantees scalability and reproducibility of results. You can achieve a narrow particle size distribution and precise control over fluorescence emission.

Thinking ahead:

Modular setup allowing the synthesis of

  • Quantum dots (CdSe or alternative materials)
  • Core shell particles (dots or rods)
  • Other inorganic nanoparticles (e.g. iron oxide as contrast agent; metal particles for catalysis)

Your expert:

Dr. Ralph Sperling
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Dr. Ralph Sperling (*1977), graduate physicist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 2012. His research focuses on nanoparticle synthesis and analytics, in particular quantum dots, with a focus on continuous processes and optical spectroscopy for online analytics. 

Heterogeneously Catalyzed Hydrogenations in Scalable Flow Reactors

Catalyst filled reactor
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

You can expect to learn how a heterogeneously catalyzed reaction can be performed in a mini fixed bed reactor while mastering the common mass and heat transfer limitations. Improved process control leads to higher yields and selectivities and an increased space time yield. Safety is improved by a reduced reactor hold-up time. The setup allows rapid catalyst screening under real process conditions.


 

Thinking ahead:

Applicability to other heterogeneously catalyzed reactions such as

  • Cross-coupling reactions (e.g. Suzuki)
  • Oxidation reactions

Your expert:

Dr. Patrick Löb
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Dr. Patrick Löb (*1970), graduate chemist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 2001. He is Deputy Head of the division Energy and Chemical Technology. His research focuses particularly on micro process engineering and the application of micro-structured components within organic synthesis. 

Modular Microstructured Reactors for Industrial Application

Laser welded large microreactor
© Fraunofer ICT-IMM
Flow miniplant reaction module
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

You can expect to learn how a family of modular constructed and structured reactors offers a way from lab to production scale, based on own patent protected novel manufacturing techniques. Our approach widens the applicability of microstructured reactors towards higher throughputs and larger dimensions. It is easily adaptable to a wide range of reaction conditions thanks to pre-designed modular solutions. Using optimally adapted milli and micro structured process equipment enables the development of intensified continuously operated processes while the integrated scale-up concept reduces time-to market. Applied advanced manufacturing techniques additionally allow for cost savings.

Thinking ahead:

  • production of fine and special chemicals, also by using unconventional routes
  • due to their compactness, well suited for modular and compact plant concepts, e.g. container-based plants

Your expert:

Ulrich Krtschil
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Ulrich Krtschil (*1954), chemical engineer, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 2004. He is Head of the group Reactor and Component Design. Due to his industrial background, his research focuses on process, device and plant development.

Continuous Flow Production of Advanced Polymeric Nanoparticles

Encapsulation
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM
Encapsulation
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

You can expect to learn how nanoparticles/nanocapsules can be formulated continuously from synthetic and natural polymers through an emulsification solvent evaporation method in the size range between 100 and 700 nm. A continuous feed of liquid and dispersed solid components leads to high yield encapsulation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic agents. The process for the production of “solvent-free” polymer-based dispersions is versatile, highly reproducible and scalable. The implementation of in-line and on-line process control/particle characterization is possible.

Thinking ahead:

  • Combination of materials with different properties in one nanoparticle to reach unique advantages for the application requirements
  • High yield encapsulation of active agents for effective protection and controlled time/environment release

Your expert:

Dr. Anna Musyanovych
© Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Dr. Anna Musyanovych (*1972), graduate biotechnologist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 2013. Her research focuses on the continuous process development for the production of polymer-based particles that react to external stimuli and are able to release the encapsulated agents in a controlled way.