On-line Process Analytics

October 25, 2017

Open House Autumn 2017

Motivated by “Industry 4.0” requirements we are preparing a many-faceted one-day program that will highlight the potential of microfluidic analysis systems and sensors for process control in the most diverse application areas of process manufacturing. This will include the monitoring of physical, chemical or biological parameters in applications such as chemical processing, contamination detection in food & beverages or oil analysis.

 

Five good reasons to join:

  • See live demonstrations of compact components and smart systems for process analysis
  • Find advanced sensors to control and optimize industrial processes involving fluids
  • Get inspired for solutions in your specific field of interest
  • Learn about the range of micro technologies to manufacture, functionalize and automate analysis systems and sensors
  • Discuss your challenges with our experts

Register soon via e-mail to openhouse@imm.fraunhofer.de to ensure your participation in this inspiring free of charge event. We’re looking forward to talk to you here in Mainz!

PROGRAM

Start with us in the mid-morning joining a presentation giving a topical overview on Process Analytical Technology while highlighting its great potential for industrial applications and the challenges regarding its implementation for Industry 4.0. Speaker will be Frank Grümbel who is a leader of Process Analytical Technology at Lanxess Deutschland GmbH.

Afterwards Michael Baßler, head of the “Analysis Systems and Sensors Department” at Fraunhofer ICT-IMM will match our in-house capabilities regarding the development of analysis systems and sensors with customer specific needs. We will then deepen your insight giving you a brief introduction to the system and sensor demonstrators being presented during a guided lab tour after lunch.  Conclude your day in the afternoon with live demonstrations of our systems, sensors and technologies.  Of course, there will be plenty of time for networking and discussing your specific interests with our experts during all day.

Lab Stations - Find your expert, discuss your needs

You will have plenty of time to individually discuss the possibilities with our experts.

On-line Monitoring of Chemical Composition

DSP-online-sensor for application in clean room environment
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

DSP-online-sensor for application in clean room environment

Touch screen user interface with indication of concentration levels
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Touch screen user interface with indication of concentration levels

The monitoring of the chemical composition of an aqueous solution is demonstrated for the example of DSP solution. DSP (Dilute Sulfuric Peroxide) is a cleaning agent frequently used in cleanroom environments of semi-conductor industries for wafer cleaning. It consists of 3.7 wt% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and 8.5 wt% sulfuric acid (H2SO4) dissolved in water. To ensure stable performance of the DSP solution, its composition has to be monitored carefully. We have developed an optical measuring technology with integrated flow-through cell that allows for an independent measurement of both, the H2O2 and H2SO4 concentration in the DSP solution, with an absolute accuracy of about 2 %. Using a dispersionless technique, we managed to minimize acquisition time down to about 1 second. The overall design is simple and robust.

 

Thinking ahead:

  • Integration of HF-measurement for DSP+ monitoring,
  • transfer of the technology to other applications in PAT,
  • further miniaturization by using MEMS technology.

Your expert:

Thomas Klotzbücher
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Dr. Thomas Klotzbücher, graduate physicist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 1998. His research focuses on miniaturized optical sensor systems for applications in industrial analytics and laser based processes for micro- & nano-structure formation.

Microfluidic Cell Counting

Optics module with single optical access for flow cytometry in microfluidic single-use cartridges
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Optics module with single optical access for flow cytometry in microfluidic single-use cartridges

2-channel scatterplot (fluorescence red/green) of melanoma cells as an example
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

2-channel scatterplot (fluorescence red/green) of melanoma cells as an example

We showcase how individual particles, such as bacteria or cells, can be detected in continuous flow. Our fully automated measurement system is based on optical fluorescence measurement and allows the parallel detection of two different fluorescence wavelengths. Hence, possible application scenarios are the differentiation of two cell/bacteria species, of living and dead cells of the same cell type, or the measurement of the total cell number. Thanks to the use of microfluidic technology and the single particle detection principle the fluid consumption during measurement is quite low making the system suitable for applications dealing with expensive fluids or low cell numbers. Additionally implemented real time data acquisition and analysis enables the use for online measurements and the successive control of the main process.

 

Thinking ahead:

  • Integration of an automated staining unit adapted to the objects of interest,
  • integration of an automated sampling unit adapted to the requirements of the specific application,
  • including the detection of the stray light signal.

Your expert:

Dr. Michael Baßler
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Dr. Michael Baßler, graduate physicist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 2009. His research focuses on lab-on-a-chip technology, in particular microfluidic cell handling, optofluidics and on-chip cytometry.

Multi-Parameter On-line Oil Monitoring

Online-Sensor with integrated micro¬controller & display
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Online-Sensor with integrated micro¬controller & display

Flow-through cell with MEMS thermal emitter and thermopile detector
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Flow-through cell with MEMS thermal emitter and thermopile detector

We present a multi-parameter non-dispersive spectroscopic online-sensor that monitors the condition of lubrication oil in engines, compressors or gears. The sensor is based on optical transmission spectroscopy in the mid infrared wavelength range, using optical bandpass filters in combination with a flow through cell. Up to four parameters (e.g. water content, oxidation, total base number, soot content, nitration or sulphation) can be monitored simultaneously. The sensor is operated in a bypass without additional computer control, due to an integrated micro-controller and display. Our sensor allows reducing machine down times and detects critical modes of operation.

 

Thinking ahead:

  • Application for process analytical technology (PAT),
  • validation of edible oils in food industry,
  • further miniaturization by MEMS technology.

Your expert:

Thomas Klotzbücher
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Dr. Thomas Klotzbücher, graduate physicist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 1998. His research focuses on miniaturized optical sensor systems for applications in industrial analytics and laser based processes for micro- & nano-structure formation.

Continuous On-line Determination of Ion Concentrations

Chip for on-line determination of ion concentrations
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Chip for on-line determination of ion concentrations

We present a technology demonstrator for the continuous determination of pH and fluoride concentration in the ppm range. The analysis protocol uses a flow-through microfluidic system applying an electrochemical evaluation method based on potentiometric detection. Our system comprises a sample preparation and dilution step to adjust pH and ionic strength of the sample as well as an analytical step to determine the fluoride concentration using ion selective microelectrodes. Continuous sampling of the solution is realized by a bypass loop. Due to its optimized fluid design combined with adapted control and interpretation algorithms the demonstrator features simple handling, considerably reduced response time (< 1 min in total), minimized reagent consumption (about 1-2 l/month) and enhanced reproducibility as well as repeatability (< 1 %).

The system is microprocessor controlled and can be designed both as a stand-alone instrument for measurements on-demand and as an autonomously working embedded system for the application in high throughput procedures such as a continuous process control unit.

The modular approach allows for the detection of single and multiple ions according to the analytical assay envisaged. A variety of detection methods based on optical (e.g., absorption, fluorescence) or electrochemical principles (e.g., conductometry, potentiometry, amperometry) and quantitative analytical methods (e.g., titration, addition or subtraction methods, colorimetry) are possible.     
 

 

We offer

  • design, testing and prototyping of single modules (sample preparation, analysis) or complete ion monitoring systems,
  • development and transfer of macro-scale analytical assays to the microfluidic chip format,
  • development of miniaturized sensors or sensor arrays for ion detection.

Your expert:

Karin Potje-Kamloth
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Dr. Karin Potje-Kamloth, graduate physico-chemist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 2005. Her research focuses on the development of (electro)chemical sensors and on-line/on-site microfluidic analysis systems.

Particle Analyzer

Particle analyzer prototype
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Particle analyzer prototype

Flow-cell inside the analyzer during measurement
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Flow-cell inside the analyzer during measurement

We will demonstrate the function of a flow through particle analyzer using dynamic light scattering as detection method. For the efficient preparation and loading of versatile carrier systems a continuous micromixer-based process is applied. The mean size of the produced particles is tunable and characterized by two analyzers at different positions inside the process chain. The measured particle sizes are used for the regulation of the process parameters by an industrial process control system. The measurement principle can be adapted for other particle systems and processes - in particular regarding flow rates, concentrations, solvents and particle materials.

 

We offer

  • In flow dynamic light scattering with flow rates up to 200 ml/min,
  • cost effective design, only parts that are used in consumer electronics,
  • measurement of a wide spectrum of particle sizes.  

Your expert:

Peter Höbel
© Photo Fraunhofer ICT-IMM

Peter Höbel, graduate physicist, joined the Fraunhofer ICT-IMM team in 2012. His research focuses on nanoparticle characterization by means of dynamic light scattering and the application of electronics and software for sensor technologies.